VOCA

An aviation researcher, writer, aviation participant, pilot & agricultural researcher. Author of over 35 scientific publications world wide.

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MetaData access by #casa – Why does #casa need to spy??

This is “…casa here – we want to help you….”

#casa [see below] has been given authority by the Attorney General to use metadata.

For us, poor old computer non-geeks, metadata is:

  • Telephone numbers
  • The time and length of phone calls
  • The internet protocol addresses (IP addresses) of computers from which messages are received or sent
  • Location of parties making phone calls
  • To and from email addresses on emails
  • Logs of visitors to chat rooms online
  • Status of chat sites – whether they are active and how many people are participating
  • Chat aliases or identifiers (the name a person uses in a chat room online)
  • Start and finish times of internet sessions
  • The location of an individual involved in communications
  • The name of the application someone uses online and when, where and for how long used

So why would #casa need this sort of information and what springs to mind – pprune, auntypru, vocasupport??

Just a few, but also the phone data is there – maybe the next call to #casa will be tracked, the post to #pprune will be read, the follow up twitter referral will be linked, then the 4.55PM  FAX or e-mail will arrive.

Not a good thought, when, if there is a suspicion of an offence against #ozaviation by the hapless pilot, engineer, aircraft owner  or AOC holder.

#casa should be in front of the judge or magistrate with a well constructed complaint to justify why the metadata access should be allowed, not being allowed to access this in a willy-nilly manner.

At the moment, #casa is being allowed to run amok and when specific allegations against an individual are properly assessed, the #casa data does not add up at all.

Lot’s of examples of this situation.


 

metadata - casa access


Aviation safety body applies for ‘metadata’ access

CASA confirms that it wants ongoing access to telecommunications metadata

Rohan Pearce (Computerworld) on 04 December, 2015 13:10

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has confirmed it has applied for ongoing warrant-less access to telecommunications ‘metadata’ under rules introduced by the data retention legislation.

CASA is in charge of Australian aviation safety regulation.

The latest annual report issued by the Attorney-General’s on the use of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 revealed that CASA accessed telco metadata 11 times in the last financial year.

“CASA sometimes accesses telecommunications data when it conducts an investigation into whether a person contravened a criminal offence provision in the aviation legislation,” a spokesperson for the organisation said.

CASA was one of the 83 organisations that accessed so-called metadata during the 12 months to 30 June 2015.

In 2014-15, agencies authorised access to telco ‘metadata’ a total of 365,728 times, the report from the Attorney-General’s Department revealed.

The data retention legislation passed earlier this year pared back the number of organisations able to gain warrant-free access to metadata.

The new regime kicked in on 13 October 2015.

The legislation initially restricted access to police and anti-corruption organisations, customs, the Australian Crime Commission, the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.

There is provision for further organisations to be authorised, however, and the Australian Border Force has been added to the list.

The Victorian government recently revealed that it has sought metadata access for the state’s Racing Integrity Commissioner.

A parliamentary inquiry earlier this year recommended that the Australian Taxation Office be added to the list of authorised organisations.

CASA said it is also seeking access.

“Following the making of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Amendment (Data Retention) Act 2015, CASA applied to the Attorney-General’s Department for ongoing direct access to telecommunications data,” the organisation’s spokesperson said.

The government won’t reveal which organisations or the total number to have applied to be authorised to access metadata.

2 comments to MetaData access by #casa – Why does #casa need to spy??

  • Concerned Aviator

    The AMROBA response..

    Quote:
    …Just when you think headway is being made and 2016 may bring about positive outcomes, a simple article in an IT magazine brings back the real truth.
    CASA still has a fixation on policing and want permanent access to your metadata.

    Worried, you should be, your privacy is being invaded.
    Aviation regulatory reform has suffered from a drought of expertise for over 25 years and has actually reduced total participation through the biggest growth period of red tape and requirements that have overlaid criminal provision for the industry to comply with – most are unproductive.
    Over the last decade, the development of aviation safe requirements has changed from implementing international aviation ‘standards and recommended practices’ so aviation participants can, if they so wish, participate in the global aviation markets. We now have regulatory criminal provisions to comply with.
    What is really being made is really Civil Aviation [Criminal] Safety Regulations designed so CASA can prosecute non-compliant industry participants. CA[C]Rs are addressing the criminal nature of all participants in the aviation industry. One would think we are participating in criminal activities against society.
    We now know why CASA structures the regulatory requirement as criminal provisions. In a recent issue of Computerworld, an article written by Rohan Pearce 4/12/2015, identified CASA as accessing metadata to help prosecutions.
    “The latest annual report issued by the Attorney-General’s on the use of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 revealed that CASA accessed telco metadata 11 times in the last financial year.”
    http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/590204/casa-applied-metadata-access/

    Though the relevant Act was changed to exclude government departments & agencies such as CASA, this articles states that CASA has applied to have access. This really demonstrates the senior/middle management, including their legal department, attitude to regulatory development and enforcement.

    The initial legislation restricted access to police and anti-corruption organisations, customs, the Australian Crime Commission, the Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.

    Is CASA Australia’s Aviation Regulator or does it have an internal vision of being like one of the above?
    Australia has created aviation requirements that are being prosecuted by a Regulator with a fixation on policing breaches of the criminal provisions they have created.
    Aviation safety cannot be regulated into people as aviation safety relies on the safety culture of participants.

    If CASA need access to metadata for ‘criminal’ offence then the Feds should be handling the offence.

    This sought of dampens all the PR from CASA about working with industry.

    This is a big brother mentality that does not improve trust or confidence in CASA.

  • Concerned Aviator

    From Hitch:

    http://www.australianflying.com.au/news/new-laws-ban-casa-from-accessing-mobile-phone-data

    New Laws ban CASA from accessing Mobile Phone Data

    10 Dec 2015

    Recent changes to the federal telecom laws will prevent the Civil Aviation Safety Authority from accessing mobile phone data in the future.

    Amendments to the Telecommunications (Intercept and Access) Act mean that CASA will no longer be able to use data from private phone calls in enforcement action.

    CASA made 11 applications for historical data in the 2014-15 period, which has enraged sections of the aviation community.

    “The TIA Act permits enforcement agencies to authorise telecommunications carriers to disclose telecommunications data where that information was reasonably necessary for the enforcement of the criminal law, a law imposing a pecuniary penalty, or the protection of the public revenue,” a CASA spokesperson had said in response to queries from Australian Flying.

    “CASA makes applications during some investigations into whether a person has contravened a criminal offence provision in the aviation legislation.”

    The type of information CASA applied for was telephone account holder names and call records (information about telephone calls made, how long people talked to each other). CASA could not access the actual content of the phone calls.

    However, CASA confirmed late today that under the changes to the TIA that came into effect earlier this year, they wouldn’t have access to even those records any more.

    The TIA amendments have limited the agencies that can apply for data to 14 criminal law enforcement agencies only, but there is provision for more to be added under ministerial declaration.