VOCA

An aviation researcher, writer, aviation participant, pilot & agricultural researcher. Author of over 35 scientific publications world wide.

Categories

Good reads

Oil Prices

#ozaviation

Overloading of Aircraft

OverWeight + casa

Remember:

[Overweight in a GA plane + (casa foi or awi)] = Loss of AOC

QF = ??? Nothing

What if this was another operator??

Overloaded Planes – Pilot Responsibility

The issue is for all pilots, the following reg, with an immediate fine of $5000 – like it or lump it.

This type of infringement could also leave the AOC holder with a “show cause” notice and the loss of the AOC.

______________________________________________________________________________________

Overloaded Planes   QF 87

Overloaded Planes – QF 87 VH-QPJ
ABC News:
Overloaded plane posed no risk: Qantas
Posted March 23, 2011 11:20:00

Qantas says there was never any risk to passengers during a flight where an Airbus was overloaded by almost a tonne.

The air safety watchdog says the incident was not reported properly by staff and the airline also failed to carry out proper safety checks after the incident.

The Qantas flight left Sydney for Hong Kong in March 2009.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has issued a report saying the plane’s load controller gave the wrong information about the amount of freight the plane was carrying. The incorrect data led to the plane taking off almost one tonne overweight.

The report says the off-loading team in Hong Kong noticed the overload but did not file a report, which meant the plane made another 10 flights before it was checked for faults.

The safety bureau says when it checked with Qantas, it discovered the airline had not conducted quality reviews at the Sydney freight centre for 22 months before the Hong Kong incident.

Qantas says while there was never any risk to passenger safety, it has since made changes to freight checks and incident reporting.

___________________________________________________________________________________________

CIVIL AVIATION REGULATIONS 1988 – REG 138

Pilot to comply with requirements etc of aircraft’s flight manual etc (1) If a flight manual has been issued for an Australian aircraft, the pilot in command of the aircraft must comply with a requirement, instruction, procedure or limitation concerning the operation of the aircraft that is set out in the manual.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(2) If a flight manual has not been issued for an Australian aircraft and, under the relevant airworthiness standards for the aircraft, the information and instructions that would otherwise be contained in an aircraft’s flight manual are to be displayed either wholly on a placard, or partly on a placard and partly in another document, the pilot in command of the aircraft must comply with a requirement, instruction, procedure or limitation concerning the operation of the aircraft that is set out:
(a) on the placard; or
(b) on the placard or in the other document.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(3) An offence against subregulation (1) or (2) is an offence of strict liability.
Note For strict liability , see section 6.1 of the Criminal Code .

Overloaded Planes – Pilot Responsibility

For a bit more casual reading and the importance of “the rules”.

Note:  There is no mention of compliance with the flight manual, but a weifgt that is determined by the regulator alone.

Put both the regs together now go to another $5000:

CIVIL AVIATION REGULATIONS 1988 – REG 233

Responsibility of pilot in command before flight (1) The pilot in command of an aircraft must not commence a flight if he or she has not received evidence, and taken such action as is necessary to ensure, that:
(a) the instruments and equipment required for the particular type of operation to be undertaken are installed in the aircraft and are functioning properly;
(b) the gross weight of the aircraft does not exceed the limitations fixed by or under regulation 235 and is such that flight performance in accordance with the standards specified by CASA for the type of operation to be undertaken is possible under the prevailing conditions; and
(c) any directions of CASA with respect to the loading of the aircraft given under regulation 235 have been complied with;
(d) the fuel supplies are sufficient for the particular flight;
(e) the required operating and other crew members are on board and in a fit state to perform their duties;
(f) the air traffic control instructions have been complied with;
(g) the aircraft is safe for flight in all respects; and
(h) the latest editions of the aeronautical maps, charts and other aeronautical information and instructions, published in AIP or by a person approved in writing, that are applicable:
(i) to the route to be flown; and
(ii) to any alternative route that may be flown on that flight;
are carried in the aircraft and are readily accessible to the flight crew.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(1A) An approval under paragraph (1) (h) may be given subject to such conditions as are specified in the instrument of approval.
(2) The pilot in command of an aircraft engaged in international air navigation must not commence a flight if the pilot has not completed an approved flight preparation form certifying that the pilot is satisfied of the matters specified in subregulation (1).
Penalty: 5 penalty units.
(3) An operator must keep a completed flight preparation form for a period of 6 months.
Penalty: 5 penalty units.
(4) An offence against subregulation (1), (2) or (3) is an offence of strict liability.
Note For strict liability , see section 6.1 of the Criminal Code .

Reg 235
CIVIL AVIATION REGULATIONS 1988 – REG 235

Take-off and landing of aircraft etc (1) CASA may, for the purposes of these regulations, give directions setting out the method of estimating, with respect to an aircraft at anytime:
(a) the weight of the aircraft, together with the weight of all persons and goods (including fuel) on board the aircraft, at that time; and
(b) the centre of gravity of the aircraft at that time.
(2) CASA may, for the purpose of ensuring the safety of air navigation, give directions setting out the manner of determining, with respect to a proposed flight of an aircraft:
(a) a maximum weight, being a weight less than the maximum take-off weight of the aircraft; or
(b) a maximum weight, being a weight less than the maximum landing weight of the aircraft;
that the gross weight of the aircraft at take-off or landing, as the case may be, is not to exceed.
(2A) A person must not contravene a direction under subregulation (1) or (2).
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(3) A manner of determining a maximum weight referred to in subregulation (2) shall be such as to take into account such of the following considerations as CASA considers appropriate:
(a) the type of aircraft;
(b) the kind of operations to be carried out during the flight;
(c) the performance of the aircraft in configurations in which it is likely to be flown and with faults that are likely to occur;
(d) the meteorological conditions at the aerodrome at which the aircraft is to take off or land;
(e) the altitude of the aerodrome at which the aircraft is to take off or land;
(f) the aerodrome dimensions in the direction in which the aircraft is to take off or land;
(g) the material of which the surface of the aerodrome in the direction in which the aircraft is to take off or land is constituted and the condition and slope of that surface;
(h) the presence of obstacles in the vicinity of the flight path along which the aircraft is to take off, approach or land;
(i) the anticipated meteorological conditions over the intended route to be flown by the aircraft after take-off and over planned divergencies from that route; and
(j) the altitude of the terrain along and on either side of the intended route to be flown by the aircraft after take-off and of planned divergencies from that route.
(4) The pilot in command of an aircraft must not allow the aircraft to take off if its gross weight exceeds its maximum take-off weight or, if a lesser weight determined in accordance with a direction under subregulation (2) is applicable to the take-off, that lesser weight.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(5) The pilot in command of an aircraft must not allow the aircraft to take off if its gross weight exceeds, by more than the weight of fuel that would normally be used in flying to its next landing place or planned alternative aerodrome, its maximum landing weight or, if a lesser weight determined in accordance with a direction under subregulation (2) is applicable to the landing at that place or aerodrome, that lesser weight.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(6) The pilot in command of an aircraft, must not land the aircraft if its gross weight exceeds its maximum landing weight or, if a lesser weight determined in accordance with a direction under subregulation (2) is applicable to the landing, that lesser weight.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(7) CASA may, for the purpose of ensuring the safety of air navigation, give directions with respect to the method of loading of persons and goods (including fuel) on aircraft.
(7A) A person must not contravene a direction under subregulation (7).
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(8) The pilot in command of an aircraft must not allow the aircraft to take off or land if a direction given under this regulation, about the loading of the aircraft has not been complied with.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(9) The pilot in command must ensure that the load of an aircraft throughout a flight shall be so distributed that the centre of gravity of the aircraft falls within the limitations specified in its certificate of airworthiness or its flight manual.
Penalty: 50 penalty units.
(10) A direction given under this regulation does not have effect in relation to a person until it has been served on the person.
(12) An offence against subregulation (2A), (4), (5), (6), (7A), (8) or (9) is an offence of strict liability.
Note For strict liability , see section 6.1 of the Criminal Code .
(13) It is a defence to a prosecution under subregulation (6) if the landing was made in an emergency.
Note A defendant bears an evidential burden in relation to the matter in subregulation (13) (see subsection 13.3 (3) of the Criminal Code ).