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#casa tries to sooth the masses

In today’s Australian [see below], #casa is trying to give an indication of a “…caring regulator…”.

Not the case at all and a couple of posts today in social media lay completely the opposite view.

That of a malevolent and vicious regulator.

What a crock. Carmody is personally “head hunting” people who disagree with him.

He cannot abide by differing opinions or calling into doubt staff.

This is not progress at all.

We need the matters raised in the #colmarbrunton survey reconciled and this does not address that matter at all.

Further David Forsyth’s 37 recommendations in the #ASRR have been poorly implemented. A change to the Aviation Act is long overdue along with a separate Aviation minister.

Not even baby steps in the Carmody note.

AND:

49 minutes ago

robbo – R44 Retweeted Phil Hurst

Not what I am seeing. Good Carmody words, but different actions.

Still headhunting when people disagree with his views

Wheras @philhurst62 says:

It looks like another positive step forward. Well done!The challenge is projecting this powerful safety foundation stone throughout all CASA

What is being commented on is the following release from #casa:

New instruction on using safety information

Date of Publication: Thursday 28th September

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has taken another important step in implementing its regulatory philosophy and ensuring a ‘just culture’ approach is taken to safety regulation.

A new instruction from the Director of Aviation Safety to CASA staff sets out limitations on the use of information that may show a contravention of the safety rules.

The instruction clarifies how information can be used when CASA makes decisions about whether enforcement action may need to be taken.

Individuals and organisations found to have violated a provision of the safety rules will be given an opportunity to address and correct safety issues without CASA initiating enforcement action.

Enforcement action will only be taken where there is a deliberate, wilful or reckless breach of the aviation safety rules, where there is a pattern of repeated misconduct or there is a failure to take appropriate corrective or protective action to address identified safety issues.

CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the new safety information instruction puts into practical effect key elements of CASA’s regulatory philosophy.

“It is vital that CASA does not simply talk about taking a ‘just culture’ approach to regulation but actively implements the principles into our day-to-day operations and decision making,” Mr Carmody said.

“Our rational ‘just culture’ approach means that where honest errors or mistakes are made CASA looks to support the efforts of individuals and organisations to make necessary improvements, correct identified problems and ensure safety risks are effectively managed in the process.

“Individuals and organisations with an understanding and commitment to safety need to take responsibility for addressing safety shortcomings and where they demonstrate the ability and willingness to do this CASA need not take action.

“CASA is encouraging a proactive approach to safety by the aviation community by clearly setting out how we will use safety information and the basis on which we will refrain from taking enforcement action based on that information.

“Of course, if the safety rules are deliberately flouted or action is not taken to address safety issues then CASA must and will take appropriate action.

“I am making it very clear to CASA staff and the aviation community that we will use information in the interests of safety and in a manner consistent with the ‘just culture’ principles reflected in our regulatory philosophy.”

Go to the instruction on the limitations on the use of safety information.

Media contact: Peter Gibson 0419 296 446

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 CASA threatens to get heavy on repeat offenders
Civil Aviation Safety Authority chief executive and ­director of aviation safety Shane Carmody.
Civil Aviation Safety Authority chief executive and ­director of aviation safety Shane Carmody.

The nation’s aviation safety watchdog has moved to spell out how it will use safety information when making decisions about taking enforcement action, ­declaring it will strike when the rules are deliberately flouted.

But Civil Aviation Safety Authority chief executive and ­director of aviation safety Shane Carmody said ­action would be taken only when breaches of the aviation safety rules were “wilful, deliberate or reckless”; there was a pattern; or a failure to move to rectify deficiencies.

Mr Carmody said: “Our ­rational ‘just culture’ approach means that where honest errors or mistakes are made, CASA looks to support the efforts of individuals and organisations to make necessary improvements, correct identified problems and ensure safety risks are effectively managed in the process.

“Individuals and organisations with an understanding and commitment to safety need to take responsibility for addressing safety shortcomings and where they demonstrate the ability and willingness to do this, CASA needs not take action.”

CASA declared in 2015 that it would demonstrate a “just culture” approach.

This approach was one of the recommendations of the Forsyth review on aviation safety regulation, which said regulators in most jurisdictions had moved this way. The Forsyth review, which was released in 2014, had warned that the aviation industry “does not consider just culture principles are adequately applied in Australia and, as a result, is reluctant to disclose information to CASA”.

Under a “just culture” approach, pilots, engineers and others who report incidents are not normally pursued unless the ­action was wilful or grossly negligent.

Regional Aviation Association of Australia chief executive Mike Higgins said it was “critical” that aviation staff felt they could report safety occurrences without fearing being punished for genuine mistakes.

Last month, Mr Carmody issued a directive on limitations on the use of safety information that CASA gets from its normal surveillance and audit processes. This extended the approach beyond reporting programs where “just culture” normally applied.

The RAAA, whose members include Rex, Alliance Airlines and Sharp Airlines, backed the move to explain where safety information would be used to cancel or suspend a ­licence.

But the association said CASA needed to “refine” what it classified as unacceptable conduct, saying that getting counselling once in the past three years for similar conduct would not of itself comprise a wilful violation or gross negligence.

“The RAAA would like to work with CASA to better refine the boundaries of what is and is not acceptable conduct,” Mr Higgins said.

“Clear and fair boundaries will maintain a healthy culture of reporting that is so fundamental to safety management.”

Mr Carmody said CASA wanted to encourage a proactive ­approach to safety.

“Of course, if the safety rules are deliberately flouted or action is not taken to address safety issues, then CASA must and will take appropriate action,” he said.


And a reminder of what was proposed in 1999: