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CASA and a presumption of innocence?? Quadrio six years later

 CASA and a presumption of innocence?? Quadrio six years later

The article by Nicola Berkovic [below] bears some careful thought, not just as to “hate” issues, but in the normal running of government.

The statement below attributed to Tim Wilson should be viewed in the light of what CASA has been doing in cases like John Quadrio, where he was subjected to double jeopardy treatment after his case was withdrawn by the DPP in Cairns Court, albeit, more than two years after he was summarily dismissed by the chief pilot under direction by CASA.

The situation got worse, with CASA relying on a 24-year old known offender for the case.

This only witness to the alleged offence was never revealed to the AAT by CASA, as a known offender. Even the offenders record was not fully revealed to Mr. Quadrio.

In the AAT of course, CASA and the AAT do not have to prove an offence beyond reasonable doubt :

AND

There is certainly much doubt about the case.

John was summarily dismissed, subjected to the poor governance of the AAT and the proven false-hoods of the CASA legal section. CASA could not even get three different FOI’s to agree.

“People should always be presumed innocent until proven guilty and there should always be an evidentiary burden before police and government act,” Mr Wilson said. “We have to make sure people are safe and secure, but that doesn’t mean throwing out the principles of the system that keeps us safe and secure in the process.”

Recently, there was serious interference with free speech in to pprune blog-site, which has seen over 10 [as far as is known] threads locked, blocked or removed.

Just because a couple of pensioners had the temerity to raise awareness in the Cairns to Canberra anti-corruption Caravan in October 2014.

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Free speech in retreat: Tim Wilson

Reporter Sydney

HUMAN Rights Commissioner Tim Wilson is “seriously concerned” Australia is going backwards in its support of free speech and says any moves to introduce tougher hate laws could make the country less safe.

His warning comes after Tony Abbott this week vowed to introduce measures to crack down on hate preachers, including “stronger prohibitions on vilifying, intimidating or inciting hatred”.

Mr Wilson told The Australian the nation already had federal laws banning the incitement or urging of violence.

“I see no evidence to justify the need for further restrictions on free speech,” he said. “It does raise serious concerns about how we could actually be going backwards and not forward on improving free speech in Australia.”

Before the election, the Prime Minister promised to repeal laws that prevent individuals from offending, insulting, humiliating or intimidating others on the basis of race. However, he shelved those changes following a backlash from multicultural groups.

Mr Wilson was concerned any further bans would restrict the free and open discussion that was necessary in a liberal democracy.

“Censorship always limits what the good say and does nothing to what the bad say. There’s a significant potential it could backfire and Australia would not be any safer or more secure,” he said.

Mr Wilson warned against throwing out basic central legal protections after Mr Abbott on Monday said some terrorist raids might not result in convictions, but saved lives always ranked ahead of a successful prosecution.

“People should always be presumed innocent until proven guilty and there should always be an evidentiary burden before police and government act,” Mr Wilson said. “We have to make sure people are safe and secure, but that doesn’t mean throwing out the principles of the system that keeps us safe and secure in the process.”

Mr Abbott said individuals like Lindt cafe gunman Man Haron Monis had for too long been given the benefit of the doubt. In the ­future, that benefit of the doubt should be given to authorities.

Mr Wilson said everything he had read about Monis suggested there had been a failure of systems and not a failure of the law.

“It’s clear there were bits of ­information that could have mapped out that he was a potential risk and that wasn’t pieced ­together for some reason,” he said.

“That should be the focus ­rather than restricting liberties when he would still have ignored the law. The thing about crooks is that they don’t pay any attention to laws.”

He called on MPs to carefully scrutinise any proposed legal changes.

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