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Carmody and #casa talks about a defective regulator

In today’s Australian, Shane Carmody, the re-cycled former employee of #casa, talks about what has been labelled by the #aviation industry as a defective regulator.

The full content is below.

The same has already been attempted in the well known and respected YAFFA produced “Australian Flying”.

 


Let’s have a careful look at what Carmody said and see where the “spin” starts and the “spin” finishes.

“………..My vision is for CASA to be an open and transparent regulator, one the aviation industry finds it easy to do business with. My conclusion after eight months as acting director of aviation safety is that achieving this goal is more a matter of reforming CASA’s systems than its people. I’m impressed by the dedication and expertise of CASA’s staff, their commitment to fairness, and where appropriate, firmness in overseeing aviation safety…..”

Truth is quite different. The Board will not talk to industry and neither will Carmody return phone calls. He hates criticism unless he can control both sides of the argument. Reform of systems will not occur without will not occur without taking the “staff” with you in the process. A major issue identified in the Colmar Brunton report was “…commitment to fairness…”, does not exist.

It is common to be threatened, refused access, avoid answers, and be lied to. This occurs through the entire staff levels to the ceo.

  • Observer at Avalon talk by Carmody and how he avoided answers

Further, the Senate Committee responsible for aviation says that Carmody is “…rude and arrogant…”.

“……By streamlining our systems, and centralising data, we can focus more effectively on using this data to continue to improve aviation safety…..”

There are about 15 different databases maintained by #casa, so obtaining information, storing and recovering it cannot be achieved as these do not cross link. Carmody again invokes CAAct 9A here and retreats beyond the spectre of a non-measurable parameter.

The matter is that of “Risk Management” and the sooner we get to that the better.

“…..ASAP will provide CASA with objective, high-level advice from the aviation community on current and emerging issues with significant implications for aviation safety and the way CASA performs its functions. It will consolidate several existing forums, and become the avenue through which CASA seeks industry input on regulatory and policy approaches……”

But no mention of GA – General Aviation here or pilots and owners. In the past both #casa and the Minister have tried and succeeded to bury the GA aspects.

Remember the Part 61 debacle.

“………My intention is that once we settle on a position we will stick to it and deliver on what we have said we will deliver. If we can do this, we will maintain the trust and respect of the industry as a whole….”

Here is in quite explicit terms, the stand-over tactics of a recalcitrant regulator and I suspect, nothing is about to change at Aviation House.

“…….CASA’s overriding responsibility for aviation safety leadership, however, means that there will always be limits. We cannot appease everyone, nor meet every request. Regulatory activities are inherently challenging and CASA ultimately has to make the call on major safety questions………..”

We are not seeing change and proper interaction with the aviation community, rather a continuation of the “dog eat dog” that has prevailed over recent years.

“……….I’m amazed how Australian aviation has evolved compared to 2009 when I was last at CASA……………..”

BUT:

There has been a substantial loss of pilots:

And look at the post 2009 numbers, if Carmody is correct and this is the evolution he claims as his own, there is no future for #aviation.

The Colmar Brunton survey of 2015-2016 shows how big a gulf there is and there is no improvement since 2009 under Carmody or since:

In the Australian of 23rd June 2017, Jetstar CEO says more regulation will damage Jetstar.

The prevalence of the “iron ring” at #casa certainly is well entrenched and remember Carmody has form.


 CASA chief Shane Carmody: reforms will help deliver safe skies for all

Drones are a new issue for CASA.
  • The Australian

While Australia remains a global leader in aviation safety, I’m very aware that we face challenges brought about by continued growth and technological change.

My vision is for CASA to be an open and transparent regulator, one the aviation industry finds it easy to do business with. My conclusion after eight months as acting director of aviation safety is that achieving this goal is more a matter of reforming CASA’s systems than its people. I’m impressed by the dedication and expertise of CASA’s staff, their commitment to fairness, and where appropriate, firmness in overseeing aviation safety.

I’m keen to improve our service delivery. People coming to CASA for approvals, licences or certificates have every right to expect efficient, streamlined and timely service. We are making a concerted effort to make doing business with us simpler, by improving our systems and centralising data, such as online forms and payment, as well as reviewing licensing and certification policy.

And we’re seeing improvement. We have received valuable feedback, for example, on aviation medicals, which will inform changes to the system. We have delivered improvements in flight-crew licensing with more than 99 per cent of applications being processed within service delivery time frames and more than 85 per cent of aviation medical applications processed on time.

By streamlining our systems, and centralising data, we can focus more effectively on using this data to continue to improve aviation safety.

Aviation is moving into the world of big data, with thousands of gigabytes generated every day. Analysed correctly, this provides an opportunity to create a new proactive model of risk management. It’s a world in which otherwise latent hazards can be discovered hiding in the data of thousands of uneventful flights.

We will know even more about what is going on by looking at data, and we will engage openly and honestly with industry. We should strive to keep industry “in the loop” about the issues we see emerging from the data and from our broader sectoral analysis. We want to be able to take a risk-based rather than a kneejerk approach to safety management.

One important objective for me has been to reboot how we consult with the aviation community.

From July 1, I will establish a new consultation body — the Aviation Safety Advisory Panel — and I am pleased to welcome some of Australia’s most senior aviation leaders to the group.

Senior representatives from Qantas, Virgin Australia, the Australian Airports Association and the Australian Aviation Associations Forum have agreed to work together on aviation safety.

ASAP will provide CASA with objective, high-level advice from the aviation community on current and emerging issues with significant implications for aviation safety and the way CASA performs its functions. It will consolidate several existing forums, and become the avenue through which CASA seeks industry input on regulatory and policy approaches.

Most importantly, through the forum we will seek to agree on the objectives and policy outcomes — before we then call our technical experts to do the detailed work.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has served on such panels in the past. Our work together will continue.

CASA’s overriding responsibility for aviation safety leadership, however, means that there will always be limits. We cannot appease everyone, nor meet every request. Regulatory activities are inherently challenging and CASA ultimately has to make the call on major safety questions.

My intention is that once we settle on a position we will stick to it and deliver on what we have said we will deliver. If we can do this, we will maintain the trust and respect of the industry as a whole.

A key recent challenge for CASA has been the growth of unmanned aircraft, popularly and irresistibly known as drones.

Drones have enormous potential for making aviation and society safer, by doing many of the repetitive and dangerous aerial jobs without risking human lives.

The economic benefits of this flourishing industry are considerable. However, this emerging industry poses challenges to us as the regulator because we now have to communicate with a new public — people who have had little or no exposure to aviation, and for whom concepts such as aviation safety for all users, restricted and controlled airspace and the safety of the Australian travelling public, are not front of mind. One of my priorities will be bringing this new group into the broader aviation community, so that together we maintain and improve Australia’s aviation safety performance.

Clearly we need to do things differently.

I know that many in the industry are fatigued by delays in some of our regulation reforms; our process has been too slow and too long, and not sufficiently focused on practical, commonsense applications. But I am confident that by working co-operatively with the aviation community we can make positive progress and deliver effective change that delivers “safe skies for all”.

Shane Carmody is the chief executive and director of aviation safety at the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

I’m pleased and honoured to have been appointed as the Civil Aviation Safety Authority’s new chief executive and director of aviation safety, and I’m amazed how Australian aviation has evolved compared to 2009 when I was last at CASA.